The Karuk’s Innate Relationship with Fire: Adapting to Climate Change on the Klamath

Type: 
Tribal Profiles
Publication: 
Conrad, A., Nix, M., Lynn, K., 2017. The Karuk’s Innate Relationship with Fire: Adapting to Climate Change on the Klamath.
Year Published: 
2017
Organization: 
US climate resilience toolkit
Description: 

Members of the Karuk Tribe in northern California maintain that the age-old tradition of prescribed burning holds the answer to climate adaptation planning in the Klamath River range. Fire is foundational to the Karuk Tribe, who live and manage 1.48 million acres of their aboriginal lands along the Klamath and Salmon Rivers in northern California. By removing accumlated fuels, fire makes room for new growth and change. This renewal helps ensure the quality of traditional foods and cultural materials and serves as a medium of cultural education. Ceremonies surrounding fire strengthen the Tribe's social networks and enhance its members' physical and mental health.

Category: 
U.S. climate resilience toolkit, climate change, human health, tribal sovereignty, self-determination, adaptation, mitigation, management, prescribed burn, wildfire, prevention, technical. climate science, TEK, cultural resources, U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit,
Status/Type: 
Profile