Adaptation Plans

Titlesort descending Year Description Category Geography Website
The Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians Environmental Assessment of Tribal Lands 2011

"Today, the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw Indians possess a small reservation of 6.12 acres near Empire. We currently hold approximately 547 acres of land, 153 acres of which are held in trust and 388 acres of which are in the process of being transferred into trust status.... Our Tribes continually strive to increase our land base in hopes of acquiring a significant amount of our ancestral lands to establish a Tribal forest, where we can invoke our ancestor’s traditions of sustainable harvest. In doing so, we hope to preserve, protect, and enhance our environment, community, and culture." This Environmental Assessment was developed by the Environmental Protection Division within the tribe's Natural Resources department. The Assessment outlines the structure and priorities of the Tribe concerning their environmental, traditional, and cultural resources. To download a PDF of the assessment, click here.

environmental assessment, Northwest, Oregon Coast Link
Tribal Climate Adaptation Guidebook

The Oregon Climate Change Research Institute, along with Adaptation International, created the Tribal Climate Adaptation Guidebook, which provides a framework for climate change adaptation planning in the context of existing tribal priorities. The Guidebook builds on the on-going climate-related work in tribal communities, directly considers the unique issues facing Indigenous communities, and identifies opportunities and guidance for incorporating Traditional Knowledges based on the Climate and Traditional Knowledges Workgroup’s Guidelines for Considering Traditional Knowledges (TKs) in Climate Change Initiatives. The Tribal Climate Adaptation Guidebook is designed to be useful for tribes at any stage of adaptation planning and with varying degrees of funding and staff capacity. The Guidebook is designed so that tribes can work through any applicable section and skip sections that are not applicable. The development of the guidebook was overseen by a group of advisors who supported the writing staff by refining the goals and objectives for the Guidebook and by providing regular reviews throughout the development process. The project was funded by a grant from the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative and received supplemental funding from the Pacific Northwest Climate Impacts Research Consortium and the Oregon Climate Change Research Institute.

adaptation, planning, resource, climate change National, Northwest Link
Upper Snake River Tribes Foundation Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment 2017

The Upper Snake River Watershed has been home to humans for more than 10,000 years. Many of their ancestors still reside on the landscape and are members of the Burns Paiute Tribe, Fort McDermitt PaiuteShoshone Tribe, Shoshone-Bannock Tribes of the Fort Hall Reservation, and Shoshone-Paiute Tribes of the Duck Valley Reservation. Together, these four member tribes comprise the Upper Snake River Tribes (USRT) Foundation. 1 The climate around the Upper Snake River is changing. USRT member tribes have already noticed shifts in species and habitats driven by increasing temperatures and changing precipitation patterns. Such changes in temperature and precipitation have resulted in drying sagebrush steppe habitat, extended wildfire seasons, less winter precipitation falling as snow, earlier spring run-off, low summer river flows, higher water temperatures, reduced flow from springs/seeps, proliferation of invasive weeds, and the decreasing productivity of rangelands. To download a PDF of the plan, click here.

Tribal Vulnerability Assessment, planning, adaptation, climate change, increasing temperatures, precipitation Upper Snake River Watershed, Idaho, Oregon, Nevada Link
Ute Mountain Climate Action Plan 2020

The information in this Climate Action Plan represents an important step in protecting the health and livelihoods of the community members in the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe. The Tribe collaborated with Colorado State University and recieved funding from the BIA to develop the Climate Action Plan. An Adaption Planning Working Group was formed and focused on six planning areas including health and livelihoods, water resources, water ecosystems, rangelands and forests, terrestrial and aquatic wildlife, and energy. The plan proposes specific actions and funding sources for each area. This information is located in Section 5. The Climate Action Plan work is a testament to the determination of the Tribe to work towards climate resiliency. To download a PDF of the plan, click here.

Adaptation plan, Human Health and Livelihoods, Tourism, Agriculture, Food Security, Air Quality, Water Resources, Riparian and Wetland Systems, Rangelands, Forest Health, Terrestrial and Aquatic Wildlife, Energy, Greenhouse Gas Reduction Southwest, Rocky Mountains Link
Vulnerabilities of Navajo Nation Forests to Climate Change 2019

"What are the vulnerabilities of our forests to climate change?"- It is crucial for the future of forest management on the Navajo Nation that this question be addressed. This report derives from a collaborative, multi-faceted effort to identify and describe the vulnerabilities of Navajo forests to climate change. By providing place-based ecological data, this report can aid in developing priorities for forest management. Through the implementation of adaptive, science-based management, the Navajo forests can become more resilient to the effects of climate change.

vulnerability assessment, BIA TRP, forest management, place-based, implementation, climate change impacts Southwestern United States Link
Yurok Climate Change Adaptation Plan for Water & Aquatic Resources 2018

The goal of this Adaptation Plan was to assess the vulnerabilities and resiliencies of Yurok waters, aquatic species, and people in the face of climate change and to identify actions and strategies that will allow Yurok lifeways, culture, and health to grow despite the changing climate. And while this Plan does not address all aquatic species nor the many, varied terrestrial ecosystems and resources, it is hoped that these will be the focus of future planning efforts. Other resources and information are included here. To download a PDF of the plan, click here.

 

adaptation plan, aquatic resources, vulnerability assessment, culture, terrestrial ecosystems Northern California Link

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