Adaptation Plans

Tribes throughout the United States are developing and implementing tribal climate change adaptation plans and climate vulnerability assessments. Search this list for examples of tribal climate change adaptation plans, as well as other plans and planning resources that may be useful reference guides. 

Title Description Categorysort descending Geography Website
Susanville Indian Rancheria: Integrated Resource Management Plan

This IRMP is a strategic, vision-based, long-range management plan based on Tribal member’s interests, needs, and concerns for their lands and natural resources. It provides guidelines for strategic resource management in order to restore, preserve, and manage these resources for future generations.

resources, management, climate change, adaptation California Link
Tribal Environmental Plan

"Today, the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw Indians possess a small reservation of 6.12 acres near Empire. We currently hold approximately 547 acres of land, 153 acres of which are held in trust and 388 acres of which are in the process of being transferred into trust status.... Our Tribes continually strive to increase our land base in hopes of acquiring a significant amount of our ancestral lands to establish a Tribal forest, where we can invoke our ancestor’s traditions of sustainable harvest. In doing so, we hope to preserve, protect, and enhance our environment, community, and culture." This Tribal Environmental Plan was developed by the Environmental Protection Division within the tribe's Natural Resources department. The Plan outlines the structure and priorities of the Tribe concerning their environmental, traditional, and cultural resources.

Tribal Adaptation Plan Northwest, Oregon Coast Link
Nooksack Indian Tribe Natural Resources Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment

The climate of the Nooksack River watershed is changing, and is projected to continue to change throughout the 21st century. In addition to rising temperatures and exaggerated patterns of seasonal precipitation, the watershed is likely to experience greater wildfire risk, more severe winter flooding, rising sea levels, and increasing ocean acidification. These changes will have profound impacts on the watershed’s plants, animals, and ecosystems, including changes in species distributions, abundances, and productivity; shifts in the timing of life cycle events such as flowering, breeding, and migration; and changes in the distribution and composition of ecological communities. Understanding which species and habitats are expected to be vulnerable to climate change, and why, is a critical first step toward identifying strategies and actions for maintaining priority species and habitats in the face of change. The University of Washington Climate Impacts Group worked collaboratively with the Nooksack Indian Tribe’s Natural Resource Department to evaluate the climate change vulnerability of priority species and habitats for the Tribe. This report describes the approach taken to assess vulnerability and summarizes key findings from the assessment’s results. The report also includes an appendix of fact sheets describing individual assessment details for each of the species and habitat types evaluated; these fact sheets highlight each species’ key climate sensitivities as well as data gaps of importance for understanding their vulnerability. Together, the information provided in this assessment offers a rigorous foundation for future climate adaptation efforts aimed at addressing climate risks to the Nooksack Tribe’s priority species and habitats.

tribal adaptation plan, assessment, climate change, flooding, rising sea levels, rising temperatures, ecosystems Washington Link
Blackfeet Climate Change Adaptation Plan

Through climate adaptation planning the Blackfeet Nation leadership is actively seeking to protect our communities and diverse ecosystems from the impacts of a rapidly changing climate. This plan is the result of the unique holistic Blackfeet Nation planning process that includes all parts of tribal government, while respectfully considering traditional values and a collective community vision for our future. Underlying the plan is the Blackfeet understanding that people and nature are one and that people can only be healthy if we ensure the health of the environment we are part of. The process and production of this climate plan has been a timely effort that is informing the Blackfeet Agricultural Resource Management Plan which is being developed concurrently. Both plans will then inform the Integrated Resource Management Plan which will be carried out over the next two years.

Tribal Adaptation Plan, climate change, adaptation, TEK, community health, ecosystem health Montana Link
Karuk Climate Adaptation Plan

"Within Karuk Aboriginal Territory on the mid Klamath, the effects of climate change including changes in precipitation patterns, decreased snowpack increasing droughts, increasing frequency and severity of wildfires, and disease and pest outbreaks are immediate and occuring now."

tribal adaptation plan, climate change, management, restoration, traditional knowledges Northern California Link
Metlakatla Indian Community Climate Change Adaptation Plan

The Metlakatla Indian Community Climate Change Adaptation Plan was composed to provide support to the Metlakatla Indian Community as they are impacted by a changing climate on the Annette Islands Reserve (AIR). Throughout this document the Metlakatla Indian Community will be referred to as “the Tribe”, this term will be used to describe the entire Metlakatla Indian Community. The Tribe acknowledges the changing climate and advocates addressing the potential effects through the integration of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and scientific evidence. This document will include the background on the AIR, local interviews on TEK, resource analysis, vulnerability assessment, and potential adaptation strategies to assist the Tribe in preparation for a changing climate.

Tribal Adaptation Plan, climate change, TEK, vulnerability assessment, adaptation Alaska (Southeast) Link
Mitigi idash Nibi: A Climate Adaptation Plan for the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians

In 2014, the Model Forest Policy Program (MFPP), Climate Solutions University (CSU), and the Red Lake Department of Natural Resources (RLDNR) came together to create a climate adaptation plan for the forest and water systems of the Red Lake Indian Reservation in Minnesota. Development of the plan came about because all parties, led by MFPP, recognized the critical need for local community resilience against the impacts of climate change by protecting forest and water resources. This climate adaptation plan for the Red Lake Reservation presents the results of a team effort, deep and broad information gathering, critical analysis and thoughtful planning.

Tribal Adaptation Plan, forests, water, development, resilience, climate change, adaptation Minnesota Link
Climate Change in Point Hope, Alaska: Strategies for Community Health

Today with the added pressure of climate change, Point Hope continues its struggle with increased urgency; against erosion and against other new emerging challenges to the community, the culture, and to public health.

Tribal Health, climate change, strategies, adaptation Alaska Link
Climate Change in Kivalina, Alaska: Strategies for Community Health

Rural Arctic communities are vulnerable to climate change and seek adaptation strategies that will protect health and health infrastructure. This report describes climate change impacts on Kivalina, a small Inupiat Eskimo community located on the coast of the Chukchi Sea. Data sources included the observations of local residents, reports from local and regional government officials and health professionals, and scientific evidence gathered from published sources.

Tribal Health, community health, climate change Alaska Link
Climate Change in Noatak, Alaska; Strategies for Community Health

This report documents climate change impacts as described by the local people and interpreted
through the lens of public health. It is the third report in a series describing climate change
in Northwestern Alaska. The first two reports focused on the coastal whaling communities of
Point Hope and Kivalina. This is the first to look at an upriver community characterized by a
different climate, environment, and cultural practices. It was prepared by the Alaska Native
Tribal Health Consortium, Center for Climate and Health in partnership with the Maniilaq
Association, the Northwest Arctic Borough and the Noatak Traditional Council. Funding was
provided by the United States Indian Health Service.

Tribal Health, community health, climate change, disease, food security Alaska Link
Climate Change in Levelock, Alaska: Strategies for Community Health

Climate change refers to change over time due to natural variability
or as a result of human activity (IPCC, 2008). Alaska is experiencing a wide range of impacts
from climate change and communities seek adaptive strategies that encourage wellness and
sustainability. This report documents climate change impacts as described by community
residents and climate change effects or potential effects as interpreted through the lens of
public health. It is the seventh report in a series describing climate change in communities
across Alaska, and the third report to focus on the Bristol Bay region.

Tribal Health, community health, climate change, natural resources Alaska Link
Climate Change in Nondalton, Alaska; Strategies for Community Health

Climate change refers to change over time due to natural variability or as a result of human activity (IPCC, 2008). Alaska is experiencing a wide range of impacts from climate change and communities seek adaptive strategies that encourage wellness and sustainability. This report documents climate change impacts as described by local people and climate change effects or potential effects as interpreted through the lens of public health. It is the seventh report in a series describing climate change across Alaska, and the second report to focus on the Bristol Bay region, the first being in the community of Pilot Point.

Tribal Health, community, climate change, sustainability Alaska Link
Upper Snake River Tribes Foundation Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment

The Upper Snake River Watershed has been home to humans for more than 10,000 years. Many of their ancestors still reside on the landscape and are members of the Burns Paiute Tribe, Fort McDermitt PaiuteShoshone Tribe, Shoshone-Bannock Tribes of the Fort Hall Reservation, and Shoshone-Paiute Tribes of the Duck Valley Reservation. Together, these four member tribes comprise the Upper Snake River Tribes (USRT) Foundation. 1 The climate around the Upper Snake River is changing. USRT member tribes have already noticed shifts in species and habitats driven by increasing temperatures and changing precipitation patterns. Such changes in temperature and precipitation have resulted in drying sagebrush steppe habitat, extended wildfire seasons, less winter precipitation falling as snow, earlier spring run-off, low summer river flows, higher water temperatures, reduced flow from springs/seeps, proliferation of invasive weeds, and the decreasing productivity of rangelands

Tribal Vulnerability Assessment, planning, adaptation, climate change, increasing temperatures, precipitation Upper Snake River Watershed, Idaho, Oregon, Nevada Link
City of Kwethluk, Alaska: Local Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan

Plan for these natural hazards : flooding, erosion, severe weather, and earthquake. Includes information to assist the city government and residents with planning to avoid potential future disaster losses. 2009

Tribal, Adaptation Plan Alaska Link
Clearwater River Subbasin(ID) Climate Change Adaptation Plan

Adaptation plan developed by the Nez Perce Tribe in Idaho, focused on water and forest resources. 2011

Tribal, Adaptation Plan Northwest Link
Climate Adaptation and Action Plan for the Norton Bay Watershed, Alaska

Adaption plan for the Norton Bay Watershed is the result of a year of community team effort, bringing in an array of stakeholders and expertise, building partnerships, extensive information gathering, critical thinking, and engaged planning. Norton Bay Inter-Tribal Watershed Council, 2013.

Tribal, Adaptation Plan Alaska Link
Climate Change Adaptation Plan for Akwesasne

Adaptation plan for the Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe in New York. Structured around the Haudenosaunee Thanksgiving Address. 2013

Tribal, Adaptation Plan Northeast Link
Climate Change in Atqasuk, Alaska: Strategies for Community Health

Assessment of climate change related health effects in Atqasuk, Alaska, a traditional Inupiat community located on the west bank of the Meade River, 60 miles south of Barrow. Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, 2014

Tribal, Adaptation Plan Alaska Link
Climate Change in Kiana, Alaska Strategies for Community Health

Assessment of climate change related health effects in Kiana, Alaska. Kiana is an Inupiat community of approximately 361 residents, located on the Kobuk River, about 60 miles east of Kotzebue. Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, 2011

Tribal, Adaptation Plan Alaska Link
Climate Change in Kivalina, Alaska: Strategies for Community Health

Assessment of climate change related health effects in Kivalina, Alaska. Kivalina is an Inupiat community of approximately 400 residents, located on a small barrier island in Northwestern Alaska. Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium. 2011

Tribal, Adaptation Plan Alaska, Northwestern Alaska Link
Climate Change in Levelock, Alaska: Strategies for Community Health

Assessment of climate change related health effects in Levelock, Alaska. As of 2012, there were about 88 residents, mostly Alaska Native people of Alutiiq and Yupik descent. Levelock is situated about 40 miles north from Naknek, 60 miles east of Dillingham and 278 miles southwest of Anchorage. Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, 2014.

Tribal, Adaptation Plan Alaska Link
Climate Change in Noatak, Alaska: Strategies for Community Health

Assessment of climate change related health effects in Noatak, Alaska. Noatak is an Inupiat community of approximately 500 residents, located on the west bank of the Noatak River, about 55 miles north of Kotzebue. Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, 2011

Tribal, Adaptation Plan Alaska, Coastal Link
Climate Change in Nondalton, Alaska: Strategies for Community Health

Assessment of climate change related health effects in Nondalton, Alaska. Nondalton is mostly Alaska Native People of Dena'ina decent, averaging about 169 residents. Nondalton is located on the west shore of Six Mile Lake, between Lake Clark and Iliamna Lake. Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, 2013.

Tribal, Adaptation Plan Alaska Link
Climate Change in Nuiqsut, Alaska: Strategies for Community Health

Assessment of climate change related health effects in Nuiqsut, Alaska a traditional Inupiat community located on the West bank of the Colville River, 18 miles south from the inlet to the Beaufort Sea. Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, 2014.

Tribal, Adaptation Plan Alaska Link
Climate Change in Pilot Point, Alaska: Strategies for Community Health

Aassessment of climate change related health effects in Pilot Point, Alaska. Pilot Point is mostly Alaska Native People of Alutiiq and Yup'ik Eskimo decent, averaging about 64 to 100 residents. Pilot Point is located on the Northern coast of the Alaska Peninsula, on the east shore of Ugashik Bay. 2013

Tribal, Adaptation Plan Alaska, Coastal Link
Climate Change in Point Hope, Alaska: Strategies for Community Health

Assessment of climate change related health effects in Point Hope, Alaska. Point Hope is an Inupiat community of approximately 700 residents, located in Northwestern Alaska on the Chukchi Sea. Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, 2010

Tribal, Adaptation Plan Alaska, Northwest Link
Climate Change in Selawik, Alaska: Strategies for Community Health

Assessment of climate change related health effects in Selawik, Alaska. Selawik is an Inupiat community of approximately 829 residents, located on the Selawik River, about four miles north of the Arctic Circle and 70 miles east of Kotzebue. Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, 2014

Tribal, Adaptation Plan Alaska Link
Climate Change in Wainwright, Alaska: Strategies for Community Health

Assessment of climate change related health effects in Wainwright a traditional Inupiat community located on the Chukchi Sea coast. Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, June 2014.

Tribal, Adaptation Plan Alaska, Northwest Link
Navajo Nation Climate-Change Vulnerability Assessment for Priority Wildlife Species

Vulnerability assessment for priority wildlife and plant species and habitats on the Navajo landscape. Golden Eagle, Mule Deer, Desert Bighorn Sheep, Mountain Lion, and American Black Bear. Pinyon Pine, Yucca spp., Mesa Verde Cactus, Navajo Sage, and Salt Cedar (Tamarisk). Navajo Nation Dept. of Fish and Wildlife and H. John Heinz III Center for Science, Economics and the Environment, 2013

Tribal, Adaptation Plan Southwest, Arizona, United States Link
Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes - Climate Change Strategic Plan

Plan includes climate change impacts, vulnerabilities and risks and adaptation strategies for the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes in northwest Montana. 2013

Tribal, Adaptation Plan Northwest, Montana Link

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