Funding

Title Organizationsort ascending Grant Deadline Description Category Funding Amount Geography Website
Community-Scale Clean Energy Projects in Indian Country Grants

DOE is soliciting applications from Indian Tribes, Tribal Energy Resource Development Organizations and Tribal Consortia to install “community-scale” or “facility-scale” clean energy systems on Indian lands to provide electricity and/or heating and cooling for local use in tribal buildings. For purposes of this announcement, “clean energy systems” include “renewable energy systems” and “combined heat and power systems.” Projects selected under this Funding Opportunity Announcement are intended to reduce energy costs and increase energy security for Indian Tribes and tribal members. Please note that on DOE website this grant can be found by searching for: DE-FOA-0000852.

Renewable energy $50,000-1,500,000 Northwest, Southwest, Midwest, Northeast, Southeast, National, Alaska Link
Evaluating the Effects of Traditional Harvest and Climate on Common Camas (Camassia quamash) in Weippe Prairie, Idaho

"Common camas (Camassia quamash) is a culturally important wetland plant, used as a staple food source by many indigenous peoples of western North America for thousands of years. Camas populations were once widespread, but conversion of wetland prairies to agriculture has led to declines in suitable habitat. Edible camas bulbs were traditionally harvested by digging the bulbs from soil, and it has been hypothesized that this process can result in an increase in the number of camas plants growing in harvested areas. Given that camas depends on seasonally wet prairies, climate and water balance are also likely drivers of camas population density fluctuations. To better understand the influences on camas populations, I conducted an experiment at the Weippe Prairie, Idaho historical site to evaluate the strength of treatment effects of simulated traditional harvest practices, including harvest, fire, and a combination of harvest and fire on three reproductive classes of common camas plants. I considered these impacts on native and non-native prairie grasses, litter, and bare ground as well. My experiment was conducted alongside of a longer-term camas population monitoring program. I used a 10-year set of camas density and flowering rate observations to analyze responses of camas to climatic and hydrological variables including average departure from 30-year means of precipitation, and minimum and maximum temperature, as well as water balance values including minimum soil moisture, actual evapotranspiration, and water deficit. I also evaluated the effects of elevation and topographic wetness index on camas densities within the study area. Study results indicate that both harvesting practices and climactic variation can have significant impacts on camas plant productivity and reproduction, and can maintain favorable growing conditions."

traditional resources, camas, land management, climate change impacts, harvest practices, monitoring, restoration Idaho Link
DOE Alaska START Program for Community Energy Planning and Projects (DOE)

The US Dept of Energy Office of Indian Energy is accepting applications for the third round of the Alaska Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program to assist Alaska Native corporations and federally recognized Alaska Native governments with accelerating clean energy projects.

Planning, Development, Sustainability Unknown Alaska Link
Tribal Government Challenge Planning Grant Program.

Previous Deadline: 05/22/2020. Funded by the California Energy Commission (CEC) and administered by the California Strategic Growth Council (SGC), the Tribal Government Challenge Planning Grant Program will provide funds for California Tribes to conduct planning to identify solutions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, improve clean energy access, and advance climate adaptation and resiliency on Tribal lands and in Tribal communities. For more information and to apply, click here.

California Link
Coordination and Collaboration in the Resilience Ecosystem

Last Deadline: July 17, 2020. The Climate Resilience Fund has issued a Request for Proposals, seeking applications for its Coordination and Collaboration in the Resilience Ecosystem Program. CRF thinks of these grants as “glue money”; funding that will be used to build upon, strengthen or connect two or more tools or resources within the climate services sector. Rather than funding the creation of new products, the competition is designed to incentivize innovative collaborations to scale existing resources, thus the size of these grants is intentionally small at a maximum request of $50,000. A total of $300,000 will be available. For more information and to download the RFP, visit: https://www.climateresiliencefund.org/coordination-collaboration. 

adaptation, coordination, collaboration, ecosystem resilience National Link
NCAI Business Stabilization Grant 12/31/2021

Rolling Application Process. Application window will be open until funds are exhausted. With generous support from Google.org, NCAI is issuing business stabilization grants in the amount of $5,000 each to a total of 28 selected Native-owned small businesses that have been severely impacted by the curtailing of commercial activity caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Awarded applicants can use the funds to address their most urgent needs to stabilize and strengthen their businesses, such as (but not limited to): making monthly payments on small business loans that have lapsed due to declining business revenues; keeping employees employed; paying their vendors; and/or purchasing equipment/software to transition or grow their businesses online. APPLICATION DEADLINE: Rolling application process; application window will remain open until all funds are exhausted.

COVID-19, business stabilization $5000 Link

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