Funding

Title Organizationsort ascending Grant Deadline Description Category Funding Amount Geography Website
Evaluating the Effects of Traditional Harvest and Climate on Common Camas (Camassia quamash) in Weippe Prairie, Idaho

"Common camas (Camassia quamash) is a culturally important wetland plant, used as a staple food source by many indigenous peoples of western North America for thousands of years. Camas populations were once widespread, but conversion of wetland prairies to agriculture has led to declines in suitable habitat. Edible camas bulbs were traditionally harvested by digging the bulbs from soil, and it has been hypothesized that this process can result in an increase in the number of camas plants growing in harvested areas. Given that camas depends on seasonally wet prairies, climate and water balance are also likely drivers of camas population density fluctuations. To better understand the influences on camas populations, I conducted an experiment at the Weippe Prairie, Idaho historical site to evaluate the strength of treatment effects of simulated traditional harvest practices, including harvest, fire, and a combination of harvest and fire on three reproductive classes of common camas plants. I considered these impacts on native and non-native prairie grasses, litter, and bare ground as well. My experiment was conducted alongside of a longer-term camas population monitoring program. I used a 10-year set of camas density and flowering rate observations to analyze responses of camas to climatic and hydrological variables including average departure from 30-year means of precipitation, and minimum and maximum temperature, as well as water balance values including minimum soil moisture, actual evapotranspiration, and water deficit. I also evaluated the effects of elevation and topographic wetness index on camas densities within the study area. Study results indicate that both harvesting practices and climactic variation can have significant impacts on camas plant productivity and reproduction, and can maintain favorable growing conditions."

traditional resources, camas, land management, climate change impacts, harvest practices, monitoring, restoration Idaho Link
FWS National Coastal Wetlands Conservation Grant Program FY 2015

Deadline passed as of June 30, 2017. Deadline for 2018 unknown. The Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection, and Restoration Act (Section 305, Title III, Public Law 101‐646, 16 U.S.C. 3954) established the National Coastal Wetlands Conservation Grant Program (NCWCGP) to acquire, restore, and enhance wetlands in coastal States through competitive matching grants to State agencies. The primary goal of the NCWCGP is the long‐term conservation of coastal wetland ecosystems. In FY 2013, the NCWCGP will fund 24 to 26 individual projects encompassing 4,690 to 5,500 acres of coastal habitat.

Wetlands, Coasts, Conservation $25,000-$1,000,000. Northwest, Southwest, Northeast, Southeast, National, Alaska, Coastal Link
Great Lakes Climate Assessment Grants

GLISA is soliciting proposals from organizations that will engage networks of stakeholders in science-grounded processes to identify, assess, and/or resolve climate-related problems or management issues.

Natural Resource Management $25,000-$50,000 Northeast, Midwest, International, Canada, Great Lakes Link
ReConnect Loan and Grant Program

Deadline Passed 07/12/2019. Deadline Unknown for 2020. The ReConnect Program is an innovative new pilot program that offers unique federal financing and funding options in the form of loans, grants, and loan/grant combinations to facilitate broadband deployment in areas of rural America that don’t currently have sufficient access to broadband. This pilot program will generate private sector investment to deploy broadband infrastructure to provide high-speed internet e-Connectivity to as many rural premises as possible, including homes, community facilities for healthcare and public safety, schools, libraries, farms, ranches, factories, and other production sites. For those who are applying for 100% loan, the deadline is July 12, 2019. 

broadband, rural areas, infrastructure, high-speed internet, capacity building Up to $200,000,000 is available for loan/grant combinations. The maximum amount that can be requested in an application is $25,000,000 for the loan and $25,000,000 for the grant. Loan and grant amounts will always be equal. Rural Areas Link
Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise Program

Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise (EESLR) Program proposals serve to enhance the management of regional and local ecosystem effects of sea level rise and coastal inundation through targeted research on key technologies, natural and nature-based infrastructure, physical and biological processes, and model evaluation. Integrating dynamic physical and biological processes with sea level rise and coastal inundation, this program strives to improve the prediction of coastal ecosystem effects to enable enhanced coastal resiliency.

Conservation, Mitigation, preparation, Coastal, Research, Infrastructure, Modeling estimated $150,000-$200,000 (program grossing $800,000) Alaska, Coastal, Northwest, Southwest, Northeast, Southeast, National, Alaska, Coastal Link
Strengthening the Public’s and/or K-12 Students’ Environmental Literacy for Community Resilience to Extreme Weather Events and Environmental Changes

The goal of this Federal Funding Opportunity (FFO) is to strengthen the public’s and/or K-12 students environmental literacy to enable informed decision-making necessary for community resilience to extreme weather events and environmental changes. Many U.S. communities face significant environmental changes, natural disasters, or economic disruptions (U.S Department of Commerce FY2014-FY2018 Strategic Plan). Projected future environmental changes include increased global temperatures, more frequent heat waves, rising sea levels, increased frequency of extreme precipitation events, acidification of the ocean, modifications of growing seasons, changes in storm frequency and intensity, alterations in species ranges and migration patterns, earlier snowmelt, increased drought, and altered river flow volumes (NOAA’s Next Generation Strategic Plan, 2010; The Third National Climate Assessment, 2014). Communities must increase their resilience now and build a long-term foundation for resilience in the future. Projects should build the environmental literacy necessary for community resilience by focusing on geographic awareness and an understanding of Earth systems and the threats and vulnerabilities that are associated with a community’s location.

Education $250,000-500,000 National, Northwest, Southwest, Southeast, Northeast, Midwest, Alaska Link

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