California Is ‘Browning’ More in the South During Droughts

Type: 
Literature
Description: 

Like a climate chameleon, California turned brown during the 2012–16 drought, as vegetation dried or died off. But the change wasn’t uniform. According to research from UCLA and Columbia University, large areas of the northern part of the state were not severely affected, while Southern California became much browner than usual. That means additional stress will be placed on wildlife ecosystems and resources that the approximately 24 million people living in Southern California need to survive, including energy, food and water supply. The problem isn’t just a lack of precipitation. Hotter temperatures due to global warming — which accelerate evaporation and make drought effects worse — are playing play a major role in many locations, including Southern California and some parts of the Sierra Nevada. 

https://casc.usgs.gov/content/california-‘browning’-more-south-during-droughts

Category: 
drought, ecosystems, vegetation, water, crisis

Geography: