Scientists

The number of scientists engaged in studying climate change is growing exponentially. This page is designed to help you identify climate scientists conducting research in your region and in specific subject areas. All information about climate scientists is derived from publically available sources. Tribes and non-tribal entities engaging in climate science partnerships may also seek information on protection traditional knowledges in those research initiatives. Resources that may be of assistance include Guidelines for Considering Traditional Knowledges in Climate Change Initiatives and the role of tribal Institutional Review Boards. An example is this Institutional Review Board Manual for the Northwest Indian College.

If you have suggested additions for this list, please fill out this form.

Title Organization Description Categorysort descending Geography Website
Teresa Bulman Portland State University

Resource management, water resources, environmental law, teacher education

Water Resources Impacts, policy National, California, Northwest Link
Aaron Wolf Oregon State University, Program in water conflict management and transformation

Transboundary Water Conflicts and Conflict Resolution, Water Basin Technical and Policy Analysis, Environmental Policy Analysis

Water Resources Impacts, policy, Planning/Adaptation/Mitigation, Impacts to Human Systems Northwest, International, National Link
Hannah Gosnell Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences

Research focuses on the drivers and consequences of rural land use change; water resource policy, management and law; climate change adaptation; environmental governance; social-ecological resiliency; adaptive management; payment for ecosystem services; sustainability transitions; transformational adaptation.

Water Resources Impacts, Policy/Management, Adaptation, Environmental Governance, Social Resiliency, Sustainability Northwest, West Link
Larry Hinzman University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska Climate Science Center

Professor Hinzman's primary research interests involve permafrost hydrology. He has conducted hydrological and meteorological field studies in the Alaskan Arctic continuously for over 30 years while frequently collaborating on complementary research in the Russian and Canadian Arctic. His research efforts have involved characterizing and quantifying hydrological processes and their inter-dependence with climate and ecosystem dynamics.

Water Resources Impacts, Terrestrial Ecosystems Impacts, Snow/Glaciers/Ice Alaska, International, Canada, Arctic Link
Franco Montalto Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN); Drexel University

Effects of built infrastructure on societal water needs, ecohydrologic patterns and processes, ecological restoration, green design, water interventions

Water Resources Impacts; Ecological Restoration; Urban Infrastructure Northeast, Atlantic Link
Jason Kreitler USGS Western Geographic Science Center

Jason's research focuses on wildfire risk and vulnerability, ecosystem services, geography of climate change, climate gap analysis, connectivity, spatial analysis for conservation and resource issues, GIS - spatial decision support for conservation resource allocation, and spatial cost modeling for conservation planning.

Wildfire, Climate Modeling, Vegetation, Terrestrial Ecosystem Impacts Puget Sound, Northwest, West, California Link
Nicole Vaillant USDA Forest Service

Current research interests include characterizing fire behavior at multiple scales, burn severity patterns, fuel treatment effectiveness, and wildfire risk analysis.

Wildfire, Terrestrial Ecosystem Impacts, Vegetation Northwest, Oregon Link
Matthew J. Kauffman National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center, USGS Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

Many ungulate populations in the Rocky Mountains are predicted to respond to declining snow levels and increased drought, though in ways that remain uncertain. This project investigated how climate change may affect the abundance of Rocky Mountain ungulates, their migration patterns, the degree to which they transmit diseases to livestock, and their herbivory impact on aspen. To complete this work we brought together a team of USGS and University scientists with experience, data, and strong agency collaboration that enabled us to quantify climate impacts and deliver products useful for wildlife managers.

wildlife science, ungulate, precipitation, snow levels, drought, migration, aspen, livestock disease, quantify Rocky Mountains, West Link
Beatrice Van Horne USDA Forest Service

My current research focuses on monitoring systems and exploring climate change policy and research management. My research focuses on processes linking population change in animals to food habits and habitat features. Understanding these processes allows for better predictions of the effects of management or other habitat change on population dynamics. My past studies have explored the effects of clear-cut logging on small mammals in southeast Alaska; mating systems, habitat, and song patterning in winter wrens; population dynamics and habitat relationships of Townsend's ground squirrels; and prairie dog metapopulations and management.

Wildlife, Terrestrial Ecosystem Impacts, Vegetation, Environmental Monitoring Alaska, Northwest Link

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